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Source link: http://archive.mises.org/9475/mises-org-is-going-open-source-volunteers-wanted/

Mises.org is going open source – volunteers wanted

February 19, 2009 by

I am pleased to announce that the entire Mises.org website is going open source. We are releasing everything you need to run a complete copy of Mises.org. This includes all the books, all the media, all the journals, all the source code, and the complete database behind mises.org.

This is not a one time release – I have created a public repository so you can get the latest version of everything as soon it hits the site.

Furthermore, anyone can submit their own contributions and enhancements the repository.

Obviously, this is quite an undertaking from a technical perspective, so we will not be able to release everything immediately. We are loooking for volunteers familiar with Subversion, change management, Windows/.Net security and open source projects to help with the initial release and provide assistance on an ongoing basis. Please contact the webmaster or comment on the Wiki.

If you want to get your hands dirty right away, the access information is below. We’ll post further updates on this project on the Mises.org Ideas Wiki.

Mises.org media/books/pdfs/journals:

http://media.mises.org/
http://mises.org/books/
http://mises.org/pdf/
http://mises.org/journals/

Mises Torrents Directory:

http://mises.org/services/torrents/

Mises.org Open Source Development Information:

http://groups.google.com/group/misesdev

SVN Access:

Browse: http://code.mises.com/svn/

SVN HTTP Access: https://code.mises.com:8443/svn/MisesWeb/trunk/MisesWeb/
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{ 71 comments }

david janello February 20, 2009 at 1:25 pm

Bad Idea Guys!

mises.org should be doing FREE software, not open source software. open source is ‘open’ for the sake of convenience, better reliability, etc. Open source favors practicality over freedom.

This philosophical difference is why free software projects like GNU/Linux have a much bigger following than ‘open-source’ projects, even when the open source projects are better on a technical basis.

from http://www.gnu.org:

What is Free Software?

“Free software” is a matter of liberty, not price. To understand the concept, you should think of “free” as in “free speech”, not as in “free beer”.

Free software is a matter of the users’ freedom to run, copy, distribute, study, change and improve the software. More precisely, it refers to four kinds of freedom, for the users of the software:

* The freedom to run the program, for any purpose (freedom 0).
* The freedom to study how the program works, and adapt it to your needs (freedom 1). Access to the source code is a precondition for this.
* The freedom to redistribute copies so you can help your neighbor (freedom 2).
* The freedom to improve the program, and release your improvements to the public, so that the whole community benefits (freedom 3). Access to the source code is a precondition for this.

Andrew Skretvedt February 20, 2009 at 2:07 pm

The idea of a growing body of enthusiasts, crafting a process for backing up and keeping in-sync with mises.org, to passport-size hard drives emblazoned with the Mises Institute’s coat-of-arms… That’s totally amazing!

Rather than Mao’s “Little Red Book,” we have Mises Institute’s “Little Spinning Hard Drive.” Of Freedom!

Ooh ooh, I have to get on my Ludwig T-shirt!

The anti-Che!

Brian February 20, 2009 at 2:47 pm

Should get a list of hashes for all the files so the integrity of mirrored copies can be verified…

Paul H February 20, 2009 at 2:51 pm

I like the idea of open-source websites :)
(I’ve only seen one site before: http://www.extremeprogramming.org/)

I hope you guys are having a good look at Plone (an opensource CMS used on (partly)nasa.gov, longnow.org, rosettaproject.org) and Git (faster than Subversion for repositories, and developed by the founder of Linux, Linus Thorvalds).

You might also be interested in Elance to find freelance programmers of experiance (or similar sites:(http://is.gd/ysf)

Looking forward :)

Paul H February 20, 2009 at 2:57 pm

@Brian

I agree. I’m a noob, but I think hashes (md5) might also be used to kind of CRC check files on the site to ensure that any specific file only exists once. No space for duplicates.

Paul H February 20, 2009 at 3:42 pm

.. just thinking. Maybe RSA Networks (http://networks.thersa.org) or Basecamp could be some good choices to get people together and get the discussion/development more structured.

David Veksler February 20, 2009 at 4:51 pm

> Maybe RSA Networks (http://networks.thersa.org) or Basecamp could be some good choices to get people together and get the discussion/development more structured

We have a Wiki: http://mises.org/Community/wikis/ideas/default.aspx

tz February 20, 2009 at 5:28 pm

GPLv3 is better if you actually want to preserve freedom, or one of the corresponding creative commons licenses for the docs.

With BSD, someone can misappropriate the code (consider Microsoft extensions to Kerberos), and there are still concerns about submarine patents on dot-net.

Publish what you want, but remember that there are subtle consequences to the license chosen, and they may be unintended.

TC February 20, 2009 at 8:49 pm

This ROCKS!

The timing couldn’t be better. Something is happening, and if I can feel it here in the liberal bastion of Seattle, I imagine others are sensing it as well.

People have stopped scoffing at what I have to say, and a great many more in an on line community I frequent are eager to learn more. I think some of the lectures that are archived here, would do the job.

Paul H February 21, 2009 at 8:04 am

@David

thanks, I was trying to sign-up via a flickr Yahoo OpenID, but it says it cant find the openid endpoint..? I’m signing up manually then.

Lucas Weeks February 21, 2009 at 12:21 pm

While not an avid reader of this website, I am aware of the work that you folks do, and I’m appreciative of it. I was very interested by this announcement because I work in the IT industry, and I have been thinking about FOSS for a while now…

The truth is, though, that I have no idea what to think about FOSS *from an economic standpoint*. There are all kinds of open source projects that I find very exciting, and, like many others, my company relies on a fair amount of open source software. Some FOSS proponents say that it aligns perfectly with free-market principles. However, much about the FOSS world, including many of the licenses, smack of socialism to me (the GPL, anyone?).

@moderator:

Perhaps this announcement could spark some discussion here about what FOSS means for those who hold to a laissez-faire approach to the economy? I’d sure appreciate the input from others. I just don’t know what to think…

geniusiknowit February 21, 2009 at 12:50 pm

I can host a mirror, but my webhost runs on linux. I’ll also be more than happy to help seed torrents.

Paul H February 22, 2009 at 4:33 am

@Lucas

I’m not entirely sure what the laissez-faire approach to economy is, or FOSS and economy in general. But I stumbled across this article which is kinda interesting though perhaps off the topic: http://www.readwriteweb.com/archives/reversing_the_enterprise_20_pricing_model.php

angry rabbit February 22, 2009 at 5:19 am

This is a most excellent move.

To all those asking “why”: shutup. Swinging the doors open on the content contained within this site (even if only the static media, books, audio, etc.) is a gateway to reaching new minds.

Never underestimate what a passionate individual with (even mild) technical ability can to that you haven’t thought of.

As a web developer of about 7 years, I’ll be the first to say that although I love everything Mises.org provides, the website itself sucks. Now’s my chance to prove I can do better.

Keep rocking guys.

Peter February 22, 2009 at 8:31 pm

And…can we get raw full-size unedited, uncompressed (or not lossily compressed: FLAC audio and HuffYUV video would be good) audio and video, too?

David Veksler February 23, 2009 at 3:03 pm

> “And…can we get raw full-size unedited, uncompressed (or not lossily compressed: FLAC audio and HuffYUV video would be good) audio and video, too?”

Why? What are we going to get to justify the effort and expense?

Peter February 23, 2009 at 4:22 pm

If it’s an effort, don’t do it – ISTM less effort than editing it. The expense will be disk space, of course, but “distributed Mises” could solve that. If it’s to be useful as “open source” material, it needs to be editable – say, for making a documentary or whatever; can’t do that with the low-quality (I mean small screen size and low bitrate, not that it’s actually bad) .wmv’s you put up. Otherwise it’s just “open content”, not “open source.”

WR April 17, 2009 at 9:48 am

Even though I am also in the LAMP/open source camp, here’s an idea that doesn’t require porting the entire ASP.net code base:

Just do something like http://sourceforge.net/ does with their download functionality. They have a huge network of mirrors, and they allow organizations with bandwidth to donate it to the open source cause. It saves sourceforge from the burden of providing all the download bandwidth, and also lets people willing to donate their bandwidth participate.

You can set up rsync so that anyone willing could mirror the pdfs, audio files, etc to whatever platform they choose, then register with mises.org that they would like to be a download mirror. When someone on mises.org wants to download a file, it will take them to a random mirror or perhaps even one local to where they are coming from.

Here’s more information on their mirroring functions:
http://apps.sourceforge.net/trac/sourceforge/wiki/Mirrors

WR April 17, 2009 at 9:49 am

Even though I am also in the LAMP/open source camp, here’s an idea that doesn’t require porting the entire ASP.net code base:

Just do something like http://sourceforge.net/ does with their download functionality. They have a huge network of mirrors, and they allow organizations with bandwidth to donate it to the open source cause. It saves sourceforge from the burden of providing all the download bandwidth, and also lets people willing to donate their bandwidth participate.

You can set up rsync so that anyone willing could mirror the pdfs, audio files, etc to whatever platform they choose, then register with mises.org that they would like to be a download mirror. When someone on mises.org wants to download a file, it will take them to a random mirror or perhaps even one local to where they are coming from.

Here’s more information on their mirroring functions:
http://apps.sourceforge.net/trac/sourceforge/wiki/Mirrors

theBuckWheat April 30, 2009 at 4:04 pm

I tend to agree with WR. Use torrent to get the latest full version of each major branch of the tree (your /services/torrents/*) and then allow rsync so I can run a nightly job that keeps up with the deltas. The added bonus of rsync is that it can retry when there is a failure.

J. Chris Folsom February 23, 2010 at 4:04 pm

Some practical questions:

What is the release cycle going to be and who will be playing the project manager?

Do you have an open issue tracker for bugs and feature requests? If not bugzilla is probably the best choice.

Be glad to help with whatever you need, although my background is primarily in Java development.

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