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Source link: http://archive.mises.org/7621/more-from-an-old-friend-book/

More from an Old Friend (Book)

January 4, 2008 by

Thomas Sowell has added yet another book to his oeuvre, and judging from this review in the Economist, it contains yet more of the “common-sense” jewels of wisdom for which he has become known, at least to lovers of freedom and free markets.

{ 16 comments }

John January 4, 2008 at 10:23 pm

You’d think the author of the article would have actually mentioned the title of book and provided a link to it.

I know what book he’s talking about but still. It’s pretty bad to not even say what book he’s talking about.

Mike January 4, 2008 at 10:54 pm

Sadly, Thomas Sowell is an ardent admirer of our global war on terrorism, occupation of Iraq, and a Fred Thompson supporter.

Brent January 5, 2008 at 12:27 am

“and a Fred Thompson supporter”

Yeah, it amazes me when smart, informed people like Thomas Sowell support “less well endowed” candidates for high office.

Of course, it could be worse. He could throw his support behind Chuck Norris and The Huckster.

Joseph January 5, 2008 at 3:11 am

What book is he referring to exactly? The reviewer never mentions the title.

Gabriel January 5, 2008 at 6:33 am

The title is Economic Facts and Fallacies.

Gabriel January 5, 2008 at 8:25 am

BTW, I don’t think Sowell admires the occupation of Iraq or the global war on terrorism:

(from “Dangers Ahead—From the Right”):

While the left has done enormous damage to the security of the United States, the political right is not without its problems. Those neoconservatives, especially, who were pushing an activist “national greatness” foreign policy, even before September 11th, have seized upon that event as a reason for the United States to “use American might to promote American ideals” around the world.

That phrase, by Max Boot of the Counsel on Foreign Relations and The Weekly Standard, is breathtaking in its implications. When he places himself and fellow neoconservatives in the tradition of Woodrow Wilson, it is truly chilling.

[...]

The track record of nation-building and Wilsonian grandiosity ought to give anyone pause. The very idea that young Americans are once again to be sent out to be shot at and killed, in order to carry out the bright ideas of editorial office heroes, is sickening.

(from “Mugged by reality, Part III”):

If nothing else comes out of the Iraq war, it should banish the concept of “nation-building” from our language and our minds. “The track record of nation-building and Wilsonian grandiosity ought to give anyone pause,” as was said in this column before the Iraq war began.

We can now add the track record of Iraq to the list of disasters.

He does disagree with Ron Paul’s “just come home” idea, though. However, not wanting to pull the troops out immediately is not the same as “admiring” the occupation.

N. Joseph Potts January 5, 2008 at 8:43 am

John -
Yes, it was terrible of me to leave out the title of Sowell’s new book.

But a little feedback, please. Did the link to the Economist article not work? They used to require a subscription to see their hallowed articles, but seem not to have been (indicating) the requirement lately.

Ben-T January 5, 2008 at 11:37 am

I’ve always heard that Sowell is a supporter of the war on terror, war on Iraq, etc. But I have never actually seen him quoted saying these things. The most I have seen from him is a few disparaging remarks about the left’s attitudes towards terrorism. I am not denying he is pro-war, but does anyone have a quote of him actually saying so?

Junker January 5, 2008 at 12:55 pm

There I found in the right side-column:

Book details

Economic Facts and Fallacies
By Thomas Sowell

Basic Books; 262 pages; $26

Buy it at
Amazon.com
Amazon.co.uk

lester1/2jr January 5, 2008 at 1:10 pm

I have his book “classical economics reconsidered”. it’s very good. It has profiles of JB Say and Adam Smith and talks about how their lives influenced their ideas and the sort of politics they tended to espouse

Frank January 5, 2008 at 6:13 pm

The Economist only requires a subscription to read online articles more than a year old; more recent articles can be viewed by anyone.

Chris Meisenzahl January 5, 2008 at 7:41 pm

I bought it last week, about half way through it, it’s fantastic. ;-)

Jonathan Bostwick January 6, 2008 at 11:16 pm

N. Joseph Potts,

The link works. When Josh said “author”, I believe he meant the unnamed author of The Economist’s piece, who also did not name the book.

aizheng January 11, 2008 at 12:23 am
gossard September 8, 2008 at 3:39 am

A major clue to Mercury’s geologic past came from the scientists’ finding of volcanic vents along the margins of the

Caloris basin, one of the solar system’s largest and youngest impact basins. The group zeroed in on a kidney-shaped

depression that was surrounded by a bright ring, lending a halo-like impression to the landscape.kswchina The scientists determined that the depression was a volcanic vent,and the bright

ring around it was pyroclastic,energy remnants of lava that had been spewed

outward, much like a volcanic fountain on Earth. Another larger ring surrounding the vent and halo ring showed that another

type of volcanism,gongwuyuan called effusion, in which molten rock from within

the planet oozes outward and covers the surface,money had occurred.foreign Together these deposits create a surface feature shaped like a volcanic shield

– a clear sign to scientists that volcanic activity helped form the surrounding plains.

maomao September 8, 2008 at 3:46 am

A major clue to Mercury’s geologic past came from the scientists’ finding of volcanic vents along the margins of the

Caloris basin, one of the solar system’s largest and youngest impact basins. The group zeroed in on a kidney-shaped

depression that was surrounded by a bright ring, lending a halo-like impression to the landscape.kswchina The scientists determined that the depression was a volcanic vent,and the bright

ring around it was pyroclastic,energy remnants of lava that had been spewed

outward, much like a volcanic fountain on Earth. Another larger ring surrounding the vent and halo ring showed that another

type of volcanism,gongwuyuan called effusion, in which molten rock from within

the planet oozes outward and covers the surface,money had occurred.foreign Together these deposits create a surface feature shaped like a volcanic shield

– a clear sign to scientists that volcanic activity helped form the surrounding plains.

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