1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar
Source link: http://archive.mises.org/6932/well-the-anti-piracy-bit-didnt-work-did-it/

Well, the anti-”piracy” bit didn’t work, did it?

August 1, 2007 by

A new survey, reported by the Telegraph, shows that nearly every teen on the planet is a music pirate, and the reality is slowing dawning on recording company execs that they need to find a way to serve the consumer rather than depend the government to protect their state-enforced monopolies.

{ 6 comments }

commonjunk August 1, 2007 at 11:03 pm

As a consumer if i only like one song in a CD then how i can only buy/pay for one song not entire CD. Is there a option for me to just spend money for 1 songs rather waste money to buy entire album?

__________________
Be great in act, as you have been in thought.
http://www.nsn-now.com

Stephen P August 2, 2007 at 1:08 am

The online music stores like iTunes let customers buy the exact songs they want. Even without such services, though, shouldn’t the record companies be allowed to sell their product any way and at any price they choose to?

As for the major record companies, independent labels are growing in popularity and offer a real alternative. With the rise of the Internet, artists don’t need a big label to become popular. Where is this monopoly, state-enforced or otherwise?

Record companies certainly need to recognize that piracy will continue if nothing changes, but as long as people are buying CDs at the current prices, aren’t they serving the consumer well enough to make money (and a lot of it)? What more do you want from them?

Mathieu Bédard August 2, 2007 at 5:49 am

Even if they don’t agree on intellectual property they should at least be very careful of a policy that would send every teenager on the face of the earth to jail…

zuzu August 3, 2007 at 4:05 pm

> What more do you want from them?

to stick to profit seeking instead of rent seeking with government threats and legal damages.

if I may criticize RIAA / major label business models for a moment, it seems to me a classic case of railroads thinking they’re in railroad business when really they’re in the transportation business (and the highways/internet are beating the snot out of them competitively). consumers are making their choice, and they want instant single-track downloads in an open format without Digital Restrictions Management.

Jean Paul August 3, 2007 at 8:02 pm

something smells fishy about the comment about the highways beating out the railroads…

the highways were gov. built…

can’t quite nail down what’s wrong here, guess i don’t like the highways being held up as any kind of example of something good.

i guess the internet was built by the state too… so i dunno what that says.

zuzu August 3, 2007 at 11:22 pm

the highways were gov. built… can’t quite nail down what’s wrong here, guess i don’t like the highways being held up as any kind of example of something good. i guess the internet was built by the state too… so i dunno what that says.

yeah, I was thinking of that as I wrote it.

but I think it’s a stretch to start speculating that filesharing wouldn’t have occurred without government intervening with DARPA. (it happened on BBSes too, unless you want to debate the corporatism of Ma Bell the modems relied upon using.) I could also speculate that without the FCC, software defined radio / cognitive radio wouldn’t have such a retarded development and we’d see something like the internet emerge anyway, but wirelessly.

also, how large a role did DARPA play in both underwriting the internet, and how much do governments meddle in the operation of the internet today? I’m reluctant to compare it to overt “Eisenhower system”-like projects such as France’s Minitel or England’s BBC.

Comments on this entry are closed.

Previous post:

Next post: