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Source link: http://archive.mises.org/6772/hans-f-sennholz-1922-2007/

Hans F. Sennholz, 1922-2007

June 23, 2007 by

He who has lived well knows how to die well. Death holds no horrors for him. It is simply the ultimate adventure of life. The death of Hans Sennholz on June 23, 2007, concluded a life of untold adventures. Born (February 3, 1922) in Germany during the hyperinflation soon after World War I, he experienced the Great Depression and the rise of Hitler’s National Socialism. In World War II, he lost his mother in an allied bombing raid on his hometown, and his father in a mining accident. His only brother, who served in the German army, did not return from Russia. He himself was drafted into the Luftwaffe and trained as a fighter pilot. He flew numerous missions in France, Russia, and North Africa and was decorated for bravery.

On one of his missions over Egypt, New Zealand artillery shot him down and took him prisoner. He was taken to South Africa, New Zealand, and finally to the United States where he spent the rest of the war in camps in New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and Arkansas. In American captivity, he enjoyed the care and support of several American relatives who had immigrated during the 1920s. Their financial support permitted him to study in correspondence with the University of Texas in Austin.

Released from captivity in 1946, Sennholz completed his education in Germany, earning a Master’s degree at Marburg University in 1948, and a doctorate at Cologne University in 1949. After a short career as a labor attorney in Cologne, he returned to the United States and continued his studies at New York University, earning a Ph.D. in economics and receiving the coveted Founders Day Award in 1955.

Sennholz began his teaching career at Iona College in New Rochelle, N.Y., and continued at Grove City College in Grove City, Pa. In 37 years of teaching, he instructed some 10,000 students. At Grove City College, he also conducted a graduate program for International College in Los Angeles, conferring Master’s and Doctor’s degrees. During his vacations he went on lecture tours often flying his own plane and addressing audiences from coast to coast.

Upon retirement from Grove City College at the age of 70, Sennholz assumed the presidency of The Foundation for Economic Education in Irvington, New York. In just five years, he revived the defunct organization through economy and productivity. He celebrated its 50th anniversary with Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher as its festive speaker. He retired as President Emeritus at the age of 75. He continued to serve on the adjunct faculty of the Ludwig von Mises Institute.

Sennholz was a prolific writer on economic, social, and political thought and issues. His writing career began with articles in the Cologne Rundschau in Germany. It continued with essays and articles in opinion journals throughout the English-speaking world. In more than 1,000 publications, including seventeen books and booklets, he covered nearly every aspect of contemporary thought. In retirement, he continued to publish on the Internet which circulated his work throughout the world. His web site counted more than 12 million international return visits.

Sennholz was the recipient of several honors. He was an Honorary Citizen of Lubbock, Texas, and of Houston, Texas; Honorary Colonel of New Mexico, Honorary Doctor of Universidad Francisco Marroquin in Guatemala; Honorary Doctor of Laws of Culver-Stockton College in Canton, Missouri; and Honorary Doctor of Laws of Grove City College in Grove City, PA. He received the Gary G. Schlarbaum Award for Liberty, and was the recipient of a festschrift with contributions by 36 authors.

He is survived by Mary, his wife of 52 years; his son and daughter-in-law, Robert and Lyn; and two grandsons, Roland and Emil.

{ 10 comments }

Dennis June 23, 2007 at 7:30 pm

Professor Sennholz was a solid Misesian, and a true economist in a profession populated largely by pseudo-economists. Especially instructive and excellent are his writings on monetary issues. Professor Sennholz deserves our gratitude for his work to promote reason in economic analysis.

May he rest in peace.

Paul Marks June 24, 2007 at 3:06 pm

I never met Professor Sennholz, but to judge from his writings and from the words of those who did meet him, he was indeed a fine man.

May he rest in peace.

Axel Riemer June 24, 2007 at 7:42 pm

I too regret having never met Professor Sennholz. All I know of him is that when I gave Human Action to my brother for Christmas, his mother-in-law exclaimed, “Why, that was my textbook in college!” She went to Grove City, and had Professor Sennholz.

Howard Segermark June 25, 2007 at 10:09 am

I met Hans many times, heard him speak at meetings of the Committee on Monetary Research and Education. Hans was not only a great thinker and writer but a lucid and eloquent speaker. When serving on Capitol Hill and working in the area of monetary policy, Hans was always available to help explain the hows and whys of how money works.
We’ve lost a great man. My sympathies to his sweet wife, Mary.

Reactionary June 25, 2007 at 10:50 am

Requiescat in pace, Dr. Sennholz.

John L. Kerns II June 25, 2007 at 9:12 pm

I was a student at Grove City College and had the privilege of being in his classes. I remember him talking about inflation and asking the class about it. Is a little inflation bad? Is a little cancer bad? The one book we used in class was called Basic Economics. One time in class he told us about flying his plane (I believe it was) to the Chicago Area for supper. Another statement at the time (I don’t remember the exact words) but it has always stayed with me. How do we compete with Mexico for example? We, (The United States) apply technology and Mexico throws labor at it. When I was in college it was Mexico, now it is China. In closing, it was a privilege to be in Dr. Sennholz’s. Classes.

Pellinore June 26, 2007 at 3:29 pm

I have enjoyed Dr. Sennholz’ contributions to the Mises daily articles. Ironically, his last contribution was to eulogise Milton Friedman … with no disrespect intended to any living Austrian/ancap writer, it’s always sad to see the "old guard" pass, and leaves me hopeful that the current generation of thinkers and writers in the Austrian and ancap movements will remember the lessons these great men had to offer.

Kevin September 19, 2008 at 1:17 pm

As a student at Grove City College in the 70′s I took every class Dr. Sennholz taught. I was priviliedged to spend time at his house at informal seminars he would give and “discussions” he would have with the 2-3 that would attend. Mrs. Sennholz was the most gracous host to us serving us tea. He was a teacher and mentor to a number of us and we truly loved him. The world has lost a great thinker and writer. Those who have been taught by him, read his writings, listened to his lectures or met him are richer for having known him and we are all poorer at his passing. He is truly missed.

God’s comfort to Mrs. Sennholz, Robert and family.

JOHN W. BUGLER August 27, 2009 at 8:54 pm

I HAD THE HONOR OF SPENDING TIME WITH DR. SENNHOLZ IN 1962.

I WAS A GUEST AT HIS HOUSE IN GROVE CITY FOR TWO DAYS.

I RECALL HIS TELLING ME THAT WHEN HE RETURNED TO GERMANY IN 46 HE WAS DENIED ADMISSION TO COLLEGE BECAUSE THEY WOULD ONLY TAKE THOSE WHO WERE STUDENTS AT THE BEGINNING OF THE WAR.

HE WAS A TEENAGER WHEN DRAFTED AND HE WENT ON TO BECOME A DAY FIGHTER PILOT.

THE DEAN OF THE COLLEGE HE SOUGHT TO ENTER — IT WAS HEIDELBERG I BELIEVE- ASKED HIM AS HE WAS LEAVING “OH BY THE WAY SENNHOLZ, WHAT DID YOU DO DURING THE WAR” -

“I WAS A FIGHTER PILOT” HE REPLIED”

“GET BACK IN HERE SENNHOLZ ”

” I WAS A NIGHT FIGHTER PILOT”

WHERE UPON THE DEAN ASKED THE SECRETARY TO GO GET HIM THE SENNHOLZ FILE.

SHE RETURNED FIVE MINUTES LATER AND SAID “I CAN’T FIND IT”

THE DEAN THEN SAID “WE MUST HAVE MISPLACED IT–MAKE HIM A NEW ONE.”

HANS SENNHOLZ WAS TO MANY OF US
A BEACON IN THE NIGHT.

BUT MORE IMPORTANTLY HE WAS VERY LOVING ,CARING , GENTLE HUMAN BEING WHOSE ONLY GOAL WAS TO GIVE GOD HIS BEST.

AND THIS HE DID TO THE BENEFIT OF ALL OF US.

GOD BLESS YOU DR. SENNHOLZ AND MAY YOUR WORK CONTINUE TO LIBERATE THE MINDS OF ALL WHO ARE HELD DOWN BY THE CHAINS OF UNCERTAIN CENTRALISM.

JOHN W. BUGLER
BUGLER.ORG

Dr.Esteban "Steve" Taracido , B.B.A.,D.Econ. July 15, 2011 at 7:32 am

I studied Economic’s at Iona College , New Rochelle , New York , under Dr. Hans F. Sennholz , and it was he , who introduced me to “Free Market Economics” , and “The Importance Of Free Markets
and The Folly Of Fiat Currency.”
He introduced his students to , The Austrian School Of Economics , Ludwig von Mises , F.A. Hayek , Free Markets , etc., in the early 1950′s.
Today , The Obama/Biden Administration , is in the process of doing the opposite of everything he taught and our one time fairly sound economy , is being decimated by unsound , unreliable , fallacious , economic policies into the 21st Century.
The USA is the world’s largest debtor nation and the confidence in the U.S. Dollar is evaporating ;
not to mention America’s debt problem that is so large , that there does not seem to be anyway
out , but to continue to inflate/depreciate our currency …
Too Bad , Dr. Sennholz , passed on in 2007 , because The USA , really truly needs the likes of him ,
to generate the clear-thinking required to get our country , out of this socialist/liberal mess.
God Bless America.
Sincerely,
Esteban “Steve” Taracido , BBA , Iona College , 1957

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