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Source link: http://archive.mises.org/6749/the-exploitation-of-children/

The Exploitation of Children?

June 15, 2007 by

Thanks to a conspiracy of health Nazis (this is a particularly apt phrase since the Nazis were pioneers in the art of badgering people over health issues), public interest law firms, and government officials, the days of kid-directed advertising for many products is coming to an end. To those who see conspiracy in every commercial, ads directed toward kids are seen as exploitative and evil, child abuse at the hands of the merchant class. And you thought they were only trying to sell you a delicious breakfast! FULL ARTICLE

{ 7 comments }

TLWP Sam June 15, 2007 at 10:17 am

On the other hand making unhealthful foods easily available could solve the grave problem of the ageing population. Younguns growing up on a diet of sugar, salt and fat will keel over before they’re 60 from heart failure or diabetes (among other things)!

Jason June 15, 2007 at 11:12 am

It is not children that are being aimed at, per say. I have noticed a pattern in our society. If socialists want to control adults, but cannot do it now, they will instead control the children. This gets future adults conditioned to the controls and more accepting of them when they are older. Do not be surprised when the same anti-commercial controls come up 20-30 years from now, for everyone including adults.

Brad June 15, 2007 at 4:13 pm

It is apt to call them health Nazi’s, and it is apt to note how industry is now de facto controlled by the government in a similar manner as Nazi Germany. Now all that has to be done is put those who still insist in eating Froot Loops in camps and use them for slave labor and there we have it (a line will certainly be drawn at gas chambers and ovens, too many carbon emissions).

And I’m not too uncertain that that is not going to be the next step. Eating such foods will be seen as veritable theft from the Public Treasury punishable by a loss of freedom. While your there you might as well make yourself useful by making solar panels and “My Bike Is My Best Friend” T-Shirts.

Mathieu Bédard June 15, 2007 at 5:24 pm

What we have is firms willing to pay from their pocket to reduce the cost of children’s information research, why not let them?

If the marginal utility of informational spots (aka advertising) is diminishing, isn’t publicity especially beneficial to kids?

Francisco Torres June 15, 2007 at 10:59 pm

On the other hand making unhealthful foods easily available could solve the grave problem of the aging population.

Who said the food being given is unhealthful? The only “unhealthful” thing I have ever eaten, for instance, is dirt, and that when I was 3 years old. I think you are just making a value (subjective) judgment.

Ohhh Henry June 16, 2007 at 7:52 pm

Statists will invoke Godwin’s Law as a “get out of being called a Nazi free” card. As long as no one is gassing unpopular citizens in concentration camps they claim that the analogy is inappropriate and is therefore it is “unreasonable” or “unfair” to use in an argument over government policy, and that from the moment the Nazi card is played they are henceforth excused from having to defend a particular government policy, no matter how draconian.

But as the documentary film about the holocaust Nuit et Brouillard (Night and Fog) asks,

“The crematorium is no longer in use. The devices of the Nazis are out of date. Nine million dead haunt this landscape. Who is on the lookout from this watchtower to warn us of the coming of new executioners? … There are those of us who sincerely look upon the ruins today, as if the old concentration camp monster were dead and buried beneath them … Those of us who pretend to believe that all this happened only once, at a certain time and in a certain place, and those who refuse to see, who do not hear the cry to the end of time.”

writeups June 17, 2007 at 10:17 pm

Yes, these people think children are incapable of reasoning for themselves. Many of them think that adults fall into that category too.

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