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Source link: http://archive.mises.org/5973/asc-named-lectures/

ASC Named Lectures

December 5, 2006 by

We are pleased to announce the named lectures for the Austrian Scholars Conference 2007

Mises Memorial Lecture
Antony Mueller (University of Caxias-do-Sul (UCS))
“Contemporary Applications of the Monetary Economics of the Misesian School”

Hayek Memorial Lecture
Gerald R. Steele (Lancaster University Management School)
“Reflecting Upon Knowledge: Hayek’s Psychology and Social Science”

Hazlitt Memorial Lecture
Declan McCullagh (CNET News.com, Chief Political Correspondent)
“Feet to the Fire: The New Media and the Elites”

Rothbard Memorial Lecture
Edward Stringham (San Jose State University)
“Extensions of Rothbardian Anarchist Analytics”

Lou Church Memorial Lecture
William Luckey (Christendom College)
“Why Do Religious People Tend to Resist the Logic of Market Economics?”

{ 1 comment }

M E Hoffer December 5, 2006 at 11:25 pm

I’m thinking that this:

FBI taps cell phone mic as eavesdropping tool
Agency used novel surveillance technique on alleged Mafioso: activating his cell phone’s microphone and then just listening.
By Declan McCullagh and Anne Broache
Staff Writer, CNET News.com

Published: December 1, 2006, 2:20 PM PST
Last modified: December 1, 2006, 6:35 PM PST
TalkBack E-mail Print del.icio.us Digg this
update The FBI appears to have begun using a novel form of electronic surveillance in criminal investigations: remotely activating a mobile phone’s microphone and using it to eavesdrop on nearby conversations.

The technique is called a “roving bug,” and was approved by top U.S. Department of Justice officials for use against members of a New York organized crime family who were wary of conventional surveillance techniques such as tailing a suspect or wiretapping him.

High ImpactWhat’s new:
The FBI is apparently using a novel surveillance technique on alleged Mafioso: activating his cell phone’s microphone and then just listening.

Bottom line:
While it appears this is the first use of the “roving bug” technique, it has been discussed in security circles for years.
Nextel cell phones owned by two alleged mobsters, John Ardito and his attorney Peter Peluso, were used by the FBI to listen in on nearby conversations. The FBI views Ardito as one of the most powerful men in the Genovese family, a major part of the national Mafia.

The surveillance technique came to light in an opinion published this week by U.S. District Judge Lewis Kaplan. He ruled that the “roving bug” was legal because federal wiretapping law is broad enough to permit eavesdropping even of conversations that take place near a suspect’s cell phone.

Kaplan’s opinion said that the eavesdropping technique “functioned whether the phone was powered on or off.” Some handsets can’t be fully powered down without removing the battery; for instance, some Nokia models will wake up when turned off if an alarm is set.

While the Genovese crime family prosecution appears to be the first time a remote-eavesdropping mechanism has been used in a criminal case, the technique has been discussed in security circles for years.

The U.S. Commerce Department’s security office warns that “a cellular telephone can be turned into a microphone and transmitter for the purpose of listening to conversations in the vicinity of the phone.” An article in the Financial Times last year said mobile providers can “remotely install a piece of software on to any handset, without the owner’s knowledge, which will activate the microphone even when its owner is not making a call.”

Is a good example of this:

http://biz.yahoo.com/ap/061126/business_documentaries.html?.v=2

And, a good example of this:

Hazlitt Memorial Lecture
Declan McCullagh (CNET News.com, Chief Political Correspondent)
“Feet to the Fire: The New Media and the Elites”

and that should make this, ASC Named Lectures, all the better.

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