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Source link: http://archive.mises.org/4694/do-not-steal/

Do Not Steal

February 16, 2006 by

“Do not steal” is an excellent principle of ethics; it is also the first principle of sound economic systems. In our time, no one has done more than Hans-Hermann Hoppe to elaborate on the sociological implications of this truth. And this is his great work on the topic: The Economics and Ethics of Private Property ($28)

The Austrian tradition is known for offering the most hard-core defense of private property, and the most consistent application of that principle, of any school of economics. The work of Hoppe–a leading student of Rothbard’s whose books have been translated into a dozen language–has focused heavy philosophical and economic attention on this principle.

This book, the 2nd expanded edition after a long period in which it has been unavailable, collects his most important scholarly essays on the topic.

The topics covered by Hoppe are wide ranging: employment, interest, money, banking, trade cycles, taxes, public goods, war, imperialism, and the rise and fall of civilizations. The core theoretical insight uniting the entire discussion is as consistently applied here as it is neglected by the economic mainstream: the absolute inviolability of private property as a human right as the basis of continuous economic progress.

The right to private property is an indisputably valid, absolute principle of ethics, argues Hoppe, and the basis for civilizational advance. Indeed, it is the very foundation of social order itself. To rise from the ruins of socialism and overcome the stagnation of the Western welfare states, nothing will suffice but the uncompromising privatization of all socialized, that is, government, property and the establishment of a contractual society based on the recognition of private property rights.

Hans Hermann-Hoppe is professor of economics at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, and a senior fellow of the Ludwig von Mises Institute. This edition is an expansion of the original edition (1993), with new essays on epistemology, ethics, and economics.

431 page hardbound volume, with index.

{ 7 comments }

Brian Drum February 16, 2006 at 1:31 pm

Just ordered. I have been eagerly awaiting this book’s reprinting. Thank you!

Brian Drum February 16, 2006 at 2:38 pm

Wow and already shipped. That was fast.

Dan Mahoney February 16, 2006 at 7:39 pm

It is indeed great news to see this magnificent
work back in print.

This looks substantially larger than the first
edition; are there new articles/essays? I’m
guessing some recent material a la Democracy:
The God that Failed has been added?

Dan

a February 17, 2006 at 7:49 am

Will it be available through Amazon ?

I ask that because it’s impossible to knwo the international shipping rate on the Mises Store. And I have some friends who suscribed to Mises Journals, but they don’t receive all issues. So, I prefer to buy through Amazon.

jeffrey February 17, 2006 at 10:42 am

It will be available on Amazon but there is a time lag between when our warehouse receives it and can start delivering the books and when Amazon can start the process.

As for shipping rates, they are not ours but rather the shipping company’s such as UPS and USPS. The software merely accepts what they feed us electronically; if the software charges more than it should, we always refund the difference to the customer.

Starting next week, we are pleased to add DHL to the shipping options. So far as we can tell, they do offer lower rates to many countries, and we are excited about that.

International orders do pose a challenge in some cases, particularly the government is in charge of delivery or customs, but 99.9% of the time it works out fine. The staff here is completely dedicated to resolving any problem that might come up.

Dan Mahoney February 17, 2006 at 12:08 pm

Let me rephrase what I thought was a simple
query: is there any way the table of contents
for the new edition can be posted, so that
owners of the first edition can judge whether
a new purchase is warranted?

jeffrey February 17, 2006 at 2:32 pm

Ok, the Table of Contents is posted here.

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