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Source link: http://archive.mises.org/17793/would-you-give-up-the-internet-for-1-million/

Would You Give Up the Internet for $1 Million?

July 21, 2011 by

I wish I had known of this video when we published "Luxuries into Necessities" last month.

It sometimes took many centuries until an innovation was generally accepted at least within the orbit of Western civilization. Think of the slow popularization of the use of forks, of soap, of handkerchiefs, and of a great variety of other things.

From its beginnings capitalism displayed the tendency to shorten this time lag and finally to eliminate it almost entirely. This is not a merely accidental feature of capitalistic production; it is inherent in its very nature. Capitalism is essentially mass production for the satisfaction of the wants of the masses.

– Ludwig von Mises, "Luxuries into Necessities"

That’s worth repeating:

Capitalism is essentially mass production for the satisfaction of the wants of the masses.

SMU professor Michael Cox has a couple of great lines in this video:

Things get better because, in order for me to succeed, I have to pay attention to your needs and wants. … I cannot make myself better off apart from making you better off as well.

Capitalism, paradoxically, starts with self-interest; but if it’s guided by freedom it maximizes social welfare.

{ 3 comments }

Bob Lince July 21, 2011 at 9:11 am

On the Rockwell blog we yesterday find:
Hayek the Jeffersonian (and Anti-Lincolnite):

“We shall not rebuild civilization on the large scale. It is no accident that on the whole there was more beauty and decency to be found in the life of the small peoples, and that among the large ones there was more happiness and content in proportion as they had avoided the deadly blight of centralization.”

On Mises.com today we find:
“Capitalism is essentially mass production for the satisfaction of the wants of the masses.”

Is “mass…for…the masses” Jeffersonian or a Lincolnite?

Vanmind July 26, 2011 at 1:43 am

I don’t know, but Timo Maas released an album called “Music For The Maases.” Does that help?

RG July 21, 2011 at 3:39 pm

Paradox? The professor fails to understand the most fundamental obviousness of human behavior: the impossibility of an action happenning outside of self interest.

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