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Source link: http://archive.mises.org/13982/the-harmony-of-the-rightly-understood-interests/

The Harmony of the “Rightly Understood” Interests

September 22, 2010 by

Nature does not generate peace and good will. The characteristic mark of the “state of nature” is irreconcilable conflict. Each specimen is the rival of all other specimens. The means of subsistence are scarce and do not grant survival to all. FULL ARTICLE by Ludwig von Mises

{ 3 comments }

fundamentalist September 22, 2010 at 9:02 am

“Hence there prevails within the frame of the market society an irreconcilable conflict between the interests of “capital” and those of “labor.” This class struggle can disappear only when a fair system of social organization — either socialism or interventionism — is substituted for the manifestly unfair capitalist mode of production.”

To see this philosophy in action, visit sojo.net. Wallis actually asks people to abandon the “gospel of scarcity” (that is, the science of economics) for the “gospel of abundance” (Marxism), although he gets highly offended if you call him a Marxist or socialist.

billwald September 22, 2010 at 1:26 pm

Thanks for this essay supporting and encouraging labor unions.

>Nature does not generate peace and good will. The characteristic mark of the “state of nature” is irreconcilable conflict.

Generally true, but some critters cooperate for mutual benefit. Wolf packs, for example. I think the essay begins by confusing evolution and Social Darwinism. If anything, humans as sentient beings are defeating the evolutionary principle of natural selection with our modern meds . . . unless we are to “evolve” into the Borg.

Evolution predicts change but not the direction of the change. So far, among critters large enough to see with the naked eye, cockroaches are probably the best adapted critter on this globe.

Jonah September 23, 2010 at 7:18 pm

Is this what Rothbard addreesses at Utilitarian Free Market section of The Ethics of Liberty when referring to Mises?

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