1. Skip to navigation
  2. Skip to content
  3. Skip to sidebar
Source link: http://archive.mises.org/12818/mercantilism-in-england/

Mercantilism in England

May 27, 2010 by

Seeing the rise of effective new competition, the older artisans and manufacturers turned to the state apparatus to try to shackle the efficient upstarts. But again and again, the market managed to get a leg up in its unending, zigzag struggle with power. FULL ARTICLE by Murray N. Rothbard

{ 6 comments }

HL May 27, 2010 at 12:54 pm

My oh my, how things just don’t change.

billwald May 27, 2010 at 6:14 pm

But now the mercantilists are international corps and the government is the IMF.

Rockne Johnson May 27, 2010 at 6:39 pm

As a very minor point: Upon fulfillment of their appreticeship, apprentices became journeymen, not masters. [A journeyman was not so named because he took journeys; it was because he was paid by the day (jour).]

Rockne Johnson May 27, 2010 at 6:45 pm

In 1666 an Act of Parliament decreed that everyone had to be buried in a woollen shroud to stimulate the failing wool trade:
“No corpse of any person (except those who shall die of the plague) shall be buried in any shift, sheet, or shroud, or anything whatsoever made or mingled with flax, hemp, silk, hair, gold, or silver, or in any stuff, or thing, other than what is made of sheep’s wool only.”

Gray Shambler May 30, 2010 at 1:48 pm

A question for someone more gifted than me. how do we know a monopoly or cartel when
we see one? Case in point, in my industry, dairy processing, the dean’s foods land’o'lakes division
has been consolidating the industry rapidly for 15 years now. on the east coast they own former
industry giants Borden and Pet and from New Hampshire to Florida they are the sole bidder on
school contracts. Within the last few weeks they negotiated to produce Walmart’s Great Value
private label milk exclusively by producing a $100,000,000.00 check. Almost all labels on the shelf that say organic or free range or whatever else are actually owned by Dean’s.
If they break no laws, and simply prosper due to the economies of scale, then, presumably
free enterprise will ultimately lead to monopoly hidden behind the facade of multiple brands?
?Gray Shambler?

Gray Shambler May 30, 2010 at 1:49 pm

A question for someone more gifted than me. how do we know a monopoly or cartel when
we see one? Case in point, in my industry, dairy processing, the dean’s foods land’o'lakes division
has been consolidating the industry rapidly for 15 years now. on the east coast they own former
industry giants Borden and Pet and from New Hampshire to Florida they are the sole bidder on
school contracts. Within the last few weeks they negotiated to produce Walmart’s Great Value
private label milk exclusively by producing a $100,000,000.00 check. Almost all labels on the shelf that say organic or free range or whatever else are actually owned by Dean’s.
If they break no laws, and simply prosper due to the economies of scale, then, presumably
free enterprise will ultimately lead to monopoly hidden behind the facade of multiple brands?
Gray Shambler

Comments on this entry are closed.

Previous post:

Next post: